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Meet the French Pin, the Claw Clip's Chic Older Sister

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Scrunchies and claw clips exploded in popularity over the past few years as fashion embraced the return of quintessentially ’90s trends. But what’s the next stage of trendy hair nostalgia? It’s officially time for a French pin renaissance.

These U-shaped accessories may seem difficult to maneuver at first, but with a little practice, they can be just as simple as popping in a claw clip or tying up a scrunchie. Plus, they instantly elevate any hairstyle — think of them as the claw clip’s chic older sister (you know, the one who spent the last semester studying abroad in Paris).

One big draw of the French pin is its power to stay put through pretty much anything.

“Your hair is not going to budge once you figure out how to get [a French hair pin] in,” says hairstylist Aviva Jansen Perea, who is also the founder of French pin-focused hair accessory brand Day Rate Beauty. “It’s a great everyday way to keep your hair up.”

French hair pins come in a range of sizes (and colors!) for any hair type or texture, but Perea’s personal favorite pin length is three inches for longer hair: “If you have collarbone or shorter [length hair], you want to go with a pin that’s one to two inches long, and if your hair is longer than collarbones or on the thicker side [or] on the curlier side, get something that’s two to four inches,” she explains.

But how does the two-pronged pin actually work? Perea recommends following one’s cheekbones to the back of one’s head for the perfect bun placement, and then gathering the hair into a ponytail at that height before twisting it into a coil. While holding the knotted hair in place, she inserts a hair pin perpendicular to the scalp and then flips it, weaving it through the bun and hair that’s taut against the head. Perea advises interlocking three pins — a “triple threat,” as she calls it — for a secure, long-lasting updo.

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Another trick Perea swears by — particularly for those with slippery hair — is misting the pins with a bit of dry shampoo or texture spray before getting started styling. “I’ve been doing that for years because it just adds a temporary little bit of grip that helps keep the style up,” she notes.

Ahead, we’ve rounded up our favorite French pins for every hair type, taste and budget. Keep scrolling to find a way to level up your lazy-day hairstyle. 

Ouidad Made For Curls Styling Pin, $18, available here

The Hair Edit Sleek Chignon Pin, $13, available here

Deborah Pagani The Rocky, $149, available here

Frenchies Grey Velvet Hairpins, $14, available here

Machete French Hair Pin, $35, available here

Jennifer Behr Gemma Hair Pin, $165, available here

Pattern Hair Pins Variety Pack, $17, available here

Kristin Ess Full Size French Pin Set, $10, available here

France Luxe Wavy Tooth Chignon Pin, $24, available here

Madewell Dotted Four-Prong French Hair Pin, $32, available here

Completedworks Drippty Drip Pearl and Gold Plated Hair Pin, $315, available here

Hugo Kreit Fuzzy Ball Hair Pin, $320 $96, available here

Kitsch Metal Enamel French Hair Pin, $10, available here

Lelet NY Drip Glossy Hair Pin, $128, available here

Day Rate Beauty Power Pin, $29, available here

Emi Jay Large Jelly Pin in Midnight, $18, available here

Oribe Geometric Gold Plated Metal Hair Stick, $80, available here

L. Erickson Elysian Chignon Pin, $36, available here

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Source: Fashionista.com

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